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April 2015 Events


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Film: Blind Chance

 

 

When: Friday, April 3, 7:00pm

Where: 4070 Vilas Hall

Sponsors: Cinematheque, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Part of the series "Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema"

Director: Krzysztof Kieslowski

Cast: Boguslaw Linda, Tadeusz Lomnicki, Zbigniew Zapasiewicz

 

About the Film: Using an exciting and experimental narrative device, Kieslowski explores three possible outcomes of Witek (Linda), a young man racing to catch a train. In each of the three different lives, politics, friendships, sex, alliances, and betrayals all play a part, in their own unique ways. Kieslowski shows how any one of those elements can alter the fate of his hero.

 

Website: http://cinema.wisc.edu/series/2015/spring/masterpieces-polish-cinema

 

Photo: Courtesy Milestone Films

 

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"The Inkwell of the Russian Messenger: Mikhail Katkov’s Editorial Politics and the Serialization of Fedor Dostoevskii’s 'Demons' and Nikolai Leskov’s 'At Daggers Drawn' (1870-1872)"

Victoria Thorstensson, Nazarbayez University

 

When: Monday, April 6, 4:00pm

Where: 1251 Van Hise Hall

Sponsors: Slavic Department

 

 

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"StopFake.org: Fighting for Truth Against Pro-Kremlin Disinformation"

Olga Yurkova, Founder of StopFake.org and Tetiana Matuchak, Chief Editor for StopFake.org

 

When: Thursday, April 9, 12:00pm

Where: 366 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Speakers: Olga Yurkova and Tetiana Matuchak are the founder and chief editor of StopFake.org, a website dedicated to truth-seeking in Ukrainian news.


Olga Yurkova, a graduate of the Kyiv-Mohyla Academy’s Journalism Department founded StopFake in 2014. The website officially launched on March 2, 2014 by a cohort of alumni and students of Mohyla School of Journalism and of the Digital Future of Journalism professional program for journalists and editors. StopFake is a fact-checking website engaged in the “struggle against fake information about events in Ukraine.” The StopFake team works to verify information regarding news in Ukraine and refute any distorted or fabricated information regarding events that are covered by the media.

 

In addition to actively searching the news for false information, the StopFake team encourages everyone to “Report A Fake” on their website. They work with their followers to identify false information, research, and uncover the truth about the news reported in Ukrainian media.

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"Thinking About Love and Death in Russia 1914 - 1922"

Dan Healey

 

When: Thursday, April 9, 4:00pm

Where: Banquet Hall, University Club, 803 State Street

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia; George L. Mosse Program in History; Alice D. Mortenson Petrovich Chair in Russian History

 

About the Speaker: Coming Soon!

 

About the Lecture: Coming Soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Free Fall

 

When: Friday, April 10, 9:45pm and Sunday, April 12, 4:00pm

Where: Sundance Cinema 6

 

Director: György Pálfi

Country: Hungary

 

About the Film: Fans of surrealist cinema won't want to miss this warped, blackly comic head trip. The film is in Hungarian with English subtitles

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: No One's Child

 

When: Friday, April 10, 4:30pm and Saturday, April 11, 12:00pm

Where: UW Cinematheque on April 10 and Sundance Cinema 1 on April 11

 

About the Film: Based on a true story, this gripping exploration of human nature begins in 1988, when hunters stumble upon a feral child living among wolves in the Bosnian mountains.

 

Director: Vuk Ršumovic

Country: Serbia

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Rabbit and Deer (Animation)

 

When: Saturday, April 11, 9:30am and Sunday, April 12, 5:00pm

Where: UW Union South Marquee on April 11 and MMoCA on April 12

 

Director: Péter Vácz

Country: Hungary

 

About the Film: The friendship of rabbit and deer is put to the test by deer's new obsession for finding a gateway to the 3rd dimension.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Hedgehog and the City (Animation)

 

When: Saturday, April 11, 9:30am and Sunday, April 12, 5:00pm

Where: UW Union South Marquee April 11 and MMoCA April 12

 

Director: Evalds Lacis

Country: Latvia

About the Film: After their forest has been turned into a city, the animals trust hedgehogs to save the day.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Blood (Documentary)

 

When: Saturday, April 11, 11:45am and Sunday, April 12, 11:30am

Where: UW Union South Marquee April 11 and Sundance Cinema 5 April 12

 

Director: Alina Rudnitskaya

Country: Blood

 

About the Film: The starkly human view of Putin's country follows the nurses and doctors of a mobile blood bank as it meanders across the crippled backwoods of rural Russia. The film is in Russian with English subtitles.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Waiting for August (Documentary)

 

When: Saturday, April 11, 4:00pm and Thursday, April 16, 3:15pm

Where: Sundance Cinema 5

 

Director: Teodora Ana Mihai

Country: Romania

 

About the Film: Like too many Romanian teens, 15-year-old Georgiana has become de facto parent to her six siblings, keeping the house together while her mother spends 11 months of the year working as a domestic maid in Italy. The film is in Romanian with English subtitles.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: The Lesson

 

When: Saturday, April 11, 4:45pm and Monday, April 13, 9:15pm

Where: UW Cinematheque April 11 and Sundance Cinema 6 April 13

 

Director: Kristina Grozeva, Petar Valchanov

Country: Bulgaria

 

About the Film: In this drama, a principled elementary school teacher in a small Bulgarian town is pushed to the brink by debt. The film is in Bulgarian with English subtitles.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: The Little Cousteau (Animation)

 

When: Saturday, April 11 9:30am; Sunday, April 12, 1:00pm and 5:00pm

Where: UW Union South Marquee on April 11 and MMoCA on April 12

 

Director: Jakob Kouril

Country: Czech Republic

 

About the Film: A little boy longs for deep-sea adventures while the city he lives in is covered in snow.

 

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: Little Ruddy (Animation)

 

When: Sunday, April 12, 1:00pm

Where: MMoCA

 

Director: Dace Rīdūze

Country: Latvia

 

About the Film: With pencil ruddy gone from the drawing board, the color red appears to be missing everywhere in the garden.

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

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Wisconsin Film Festival: New Species

 

When: Sunday, April 12, 1:00pm

Where: MMoCA

 

Director: Kateřina Karhánková

Country: Czech Republic

 

About the Film: Stumbling across a mysterios bone sparks the imagination of three kids.

 

 

 

Click here to buy tickets online and for more information on the film festival and the movies playing.

 

 

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"Help-seeking and Barriers of Domestic Violence Survivors in Kyrgyzstan: A Grounded Theory Study"

Saltanat Childress, PhD Candidate, University of Maryland School of Social Work

 

When: Thursday, April 16, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

About the Speaker: Saltanat Childress is a PhD Candidate at the School of Social Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore and an Honorary Fellow at the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds her MSW from Washington University in St. Louis, Brown School of Social Work. Saltanat worked as a Program Coordinator for the international development programs funded by the USAID, Asian Development Bank, European Union, and other international organizations in Kyrgyzstan and elsewhere in Central Asia on issues of land tenure rights, community-based public health, social economic rehabilitation and empowerment of women. She has extensive experience in coordinating community-based programs and conducting intervention research, managing regional level public information campaigns, and liaising relations with local governments on behalf of the international development programs.

 

About the Lecture: This talk explores the experiences of women with gender-based violence in Kyrgyzstan, their coping mechanisms, and barriers to help-seeking, using methods of qualitative research and grounded theory development. Several reports of international organizations have emphasized the scope of domestic violence in Kyrgyzstan, yet no study has attempted to examine the meaning of domestic violence from the perspective of the survivors. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative approach to explore the experiences of women survivors in order to better understand what initiatives could make social services, law enforcement, and public health systems more responsive to their needs. The experiences narrated by the women in this study emphasize the need for concerted multi-sectoral efforts to advance the safety and protection of women in Kyrgyzstan. More broadly, the findings highlight the wider societal issues that must be addressed in Kyrgyzstan to combat the problem of gender-based violence and suggest a number of important areas for future theory, practice, and research.

 

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Film: Provincial Actors

 

When: Friday, April 17, 7:00pm

Where: 4070 Vilas Hall

Sponsors: Cinematheque, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Part of the series "Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema"

Director: Agnieszka Holland

Cast: Halina Labonarska, Tadeusz Huk, Iwona Biernacka

 

About the Film: Krzysztof, a leading actor in a provincial theater troupe, locks horns with the director of a politically charged play. At home, he faces a crumbling marriage as his pupeteer wife, Anka, grows impatient with his ego and need to become a star. For her first feature as a sole director, Holland (Europa Europa) convincingly and humorously depicts the pressures felt by artists living under a communist regime.

 

Website: http://cinema.wisc.edu/series/2015/spring/masterpieces-polish-cinema

 

Photo: Courtesy Milestone Films

 

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"Homeland Literacy Learning Under Conditions of Brain Drain: A Case of Study of Migrants' Left-Behind Family Members in Latvia"

Kate Vieria, English Department

 

When: Wednesday, April 22, 12:00pm

Where: 254 Van Hise Hall

Sponsors: Language Institute; Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia; Department of English; and Doctoral Program in Second Language Acquisition

 

About the Lecture: During the recent global recession, many skilled working age adults left their homelands to work abroad. Among the immigrant-sending countries was the former Soviet and newly minted European Union state, Latvia, whose net migration rate is higher than that of Mexico and comparable to many places with longstanding conflict. Both the popular press and Latvia's prime minister have referred to this mass outmigration as "brain drain," pointing to children being raised by grandparents, schools closing, and the iconic tragedy of Latvian civil engineers leaving Latvia to pick strawberries in England. Homelands clearly lose valuable knowledge, skills, and experiences when educated citizens emigrate. This talk shows, however, that in the process of "brain drain," educational resources may also be gained. As homeland family members communicate with loved ones abroad, both parties gain familiarity with communication technologies, such as email, video chat, instant messaging, and extended personal letters. Such migration-driven literacy practices and technologies, what I call "writing remittances," circulate within an informal economy of community-based literacy learning in migrants' homelands. Based on 27 qualitative interviews and ethnographic field notes in a migrant home community in Latvia, this talk details the economic and emotional value of this transnational community literacy learning. I recast emigration, a lamentable trend, as a crucial site of informal literacy pedagogy, with implications for homelands beset with high unemployment and poverty.

 

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Screening and Post-Film Discussion: Aghet: A Genocide

Scott Straus, Political Science and International Studies

 

When: Wednesday, April 22, 3:00pm

Where: Union South, TITU, 1308 W Dayton Street

Sponsors: Amnesty International; Center for Russia, East Europe and Central Asia

 

About the Speaker: Scott Straus is Professor of Political Science and International Studies at UW-Madison. Scott specializes in the study of genocide, political violence, human rights, and African politics.
His most recent book publication is Making and Unmaking Nations: War, Leadership, and Genocide in Modern Africa (Cornell University Press, 2015). His introductory book on genocide, Fundamentals of Atrocity Prevention, is scheduled for publication in late 2015 by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. He has also published several books on Rwanda, including The Order of Genocide: Race, Power, and War in Rwanda(Cornell University Press, 2006); Remaking Rwanda: State Building and Human Rights after Mass Violence (University of Wisconsin Press, 2011); and Intimate Enemy (Zone Books, 2006). Scott also co-authored (with David Leonard) Africa’s Stalled Development (Lynne Rienner, 2003), translated The Great Lakes of Africa (Zone Books, 2003) and co-edited (with Steve Stern) The Human Rights Paradox (University of Wisconsin Press, 2014). He has also published in the American Journal of Political Science, Perspectives on Politics, Foreign Affairs, World Politics, Politics & Society, Journal of Genocide Research, African Affairs, Terrorism and Political Violence, Genocide Studies and Prevention, and the Canadian Journal of African Studies.


Scott has received fellowships from the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, and the United States Institute of Peace. In 2009, he was awarded the campus-wide William H. Kiekhofer Distinguished Teaching Award. In 2011, he was named a Winnick Fellow at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. He co-edits the book series Critical Human Rights with Steve Stern. Before starting in academia, Scott was a freelance journalist based in Nairobi, Kenya.

 

About the Event: In honor of April’s Genocide Awareness Month, Amnesty International-UW Presents German documentary film AGHET: A Genocide. This 2010 film directed by Eric Fiedler depicts the annihilation of 1.5 million Armenians from 1915-1923 and critically discusses international denial of the mass killings.
April 24 will mark the 100th anniversary of genocide against the Armenians. The screening will be followed by open and dialogue and discussion facilitated by University of Wisconsin-Madison Political Science Professor Scott Straus.

 

More Resources:

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/08/398224594/april-marks-the-centennial-of-armenian-genocide

https://www.facebook.com/events/1431260627185002/

 

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"Classical Russian Literature and Digital Humanities (Russian Digital Libraries: New Developments)"

Igor Pilshchikov, Lead Researcher, Institute for World Culture, Moscow State University

 

When: Thursday, April 23, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, the Russian Flagship Program, and CREECA

 

About the Speaker: Igor Pilshchikov is a lead researcher at the Institute for World Culture at the Moscow State University and a senior researcher at Tallinn University. He is the author of Batiushkov and Italian Literature (2003, in Russian) and Vocabulary and Phraseology of “Eugene Onegin” (with Igor Dobrodomov, 2008, in Russian). His research interests include history of Russian literature, comparative literature, history of Russian poetic language, editorial theory, literary theory, cultural semiotics, and digital humanities. Dr. Pilshchikov is the founding editor-in-chief of the internationally acclaimed Fundamental Digital Library of Russian Literature and Folklore (www.FEB-web.ru) and Russian Virtual Library (www.RVB.ru), former editor-in-chief of a bilingual journal of Russian and theoretical philology, Philologica, and co-editor of the biannual journal of prosody and poetics, Studia Metrica et Poetica.

 

About the Lecture: Providing an overview of the burgeoning area of digital humanities in Russia, the lecture will focus on digital libraries and collections of texts that offer comprehensive body of materials pertaining to classical Russian literature and folklore. In particular, attention will be given to their functional capabilities (information search and retrieval) and methods of text presentation (text, image, image+text), as well as to available reference tools (concordances, dictionaries, encyclopedias, bibliography). Additionally, digital resources designed for the analysis of Russian literary texts will be discussed: Russian language corpora, tools for linguistic analysis (such as morphological analyzer), and programs of digital-computational verse analysis.

 

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"Book Talk: Passage: A Family's Exodus and Odyssey for Survival"

John Schissler

 

When: Thursday, April 23, 7:00pm

Where: Wisconsin Veterans Museum, 30 Mifflin Street

Sponsors: Wisconsin Veterans Museum

 

About the Speaker: Mr Schissler was born in Yugoslavia in 1943, but his family was ethnically German and toward the end of the war, fled the country.  They remained refugees in Eastern Europe for five years before finally making it to the United States. His book tells his family’s story. 

 

About the Book: In this compelling autobiography, World War II survivor, John Schissler Jr., captures what really happens to people in the wicked no man's land of war and rehabilitaiton, as his family must wade through the crushing tide of WWII, and somehow rise above a violent, dirty flood of complect political and military conflicts in Czech, Hungarian and later East and West German countrysides and villages. Passage: The Making of An American Family lays out in gritty detail that an official end to war in no way meant an end to the struggle of those most effected most by it.

 

For more information, visit http://www.wisvetsmuseum.com/events/?ID=116.

 

 

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Film: Man of Iron

 

When: Friday, April 24, 7:00pm

Where: 4070 Vilas Hall

Sponsors: Cinematheque, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Part of the series "Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema"

Director: Andrzej Wajda

Cast: Jerzy Radziwilowicz, Krystyna Janda, Lech Walesa

 

About the Film: Wajda traces the history of the solidarity movement in Poland by following the fictional rise of a labor leader (Radziwilowicz) through the eyes of an alcoholic radio journalist. Providing the story with great authenticity, Wajda weaves in actual footage of strikes and demonstrations led by Walesa, who also appears as himself at the wedding of the hero.

 

Website: http://cinema.wisc.edu/series/2015/spring/masterpieces-polish-cinema

 

Photo: Courtesy Milestone Films

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Russian Lierature and Music Salon: Saint Petersburg

 

When: Saturday, April 25, 1:30pm

Where: Morphy Hall

Sponsors: Cinematheque, Department of Slavic Languages and Literature and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Part of the series "Martin Scorsese Presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema"

Director: Andrzej Wajda

Cast: Jerzy Radziwilowicz, Krystyna Janda, Lech Walesa

 

About the Event: The project involves several students and faculty members from various departments, and it will be devoted to writers and composers who were connected to St. Petersburg in their lives and works: N. V. Gogol, A. A. Akhmatova, J. A. Brodsky, S. Prokofiev, and A. Schnittke. Our listeners will experience their masterpieces through the prism of Russian music, language, and visual images. By attempting to combine literature, music, and art we hope to recreate the atmosphere of St.Petersburg’s culture. The project will carry the 21st century audience through Gogol’s 19th-century characters, Akhmatova and Brodsky’s 20th-century images by means of 20th-century music. “Russian Literature and the Music Salon” will provide a cultural insight into the Russian heritage through diverse perspectives, not only from various art genres, but also different eras.

 

People include:

Oxana Khramova, piano

Yana Groves, piano,

Nicole Heinen, soprano

Ilona Sotnikova, visual images and literature

Conor Ryan, narrator

 

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I Loved You ... The Muses of Pushkin

 

When: Sunday, April 26, 5:00pm

Where: West Madison Senior Center, 602 Sawyer Terrace

Sponsors: The Russian Amateur Theater of Madison, WI

 

Adapted for Stage and Performance and Directed by: Galina Gerchikova

 

Based on poetry and letters by Alexander Pushkin, memoirs of Maria Raevskaya and Anna Kern


About the Event:
Every year, the Russian Theater in Madison has a performance based on poetry of famous Russian poets. They have performed Pushkin, Mandelshtam, Pasternak, Akhmatova, Tsveaeva and Esesnin. This year, the event is based on poetry and letters by Alexander Pushkin andmemoirs of Maria Raevskaya and Anna Kern.

 

 

 

 

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Film Screening: My Perestroika

 

When: Wednesday, April 29, 7:00pm

Where: Marquee Theater, Union South, 1308 W. Dayton Street

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, the Russian Flagship Program, and the WUD Film Committee

 

Director: Robin Hessman

 

A discussion with the film's director, Robin Hessman, will be held immediately following the screening.

 

Robin Hessman | 2010 | 87 min | in Russian with English subtitles


Synopsis:
When the USSR broke apart in 1991, a generation of young people faced a new realm of possibilities. An intimate epic about the extraordinary lives of this last Soviet generation, Robin Hessman’s feature documentary debut tells the stories of five Moscow schoolmates who were brought up behind the Iron Curtain, witnessed the joy and confusion of glasnost', and reached adulthood right as the world changed around them. Through candid first-person testimony, revealing verité footage, and vintage home movies, Hessman, who spent many years living in Moscow, reveals a Russia rarely ever seen on film, where people are frank about their lives and forthcoming about their country. Engaging, funny, and positively inspiring, "My Perestroika" tells a story where politics is personal, honesty overshadows ideology, and history progresses one day, one life at a time.

 

About the Director: Robin Hessman has been a documentary filmmaker and producer for the past 20 years. Her critically-acclaimed film, My Perestroika, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2010 as part of the US Documentary Competition, aired in 2011 on the PBS independent film series P.O.V. and received a Peabody Award in 2012. Throughout the 1990s she lived in Russia making documentaries and working for Sesame Workshop as the on-site Producer of Ulitsa Sezam, the original Russian language Sesame Street. Robin also co-produced the Peabody-award winning documentary Tupperware! as well as the PBS biography of culinary master Julia Child in Julia! America’s Favorite Chef which aired on PBS on the series American Masters.In addition to her film and TV work, Robin has appeared on the PBS NewsHour, written for The Financial Times and produced radio pieces on Russia for the BBC’s The World. She served as the Director of Documentary Programming for the American Film Festival of Moscow for 5 years. She has been a Copeland Fellow at Amherst College, a Fellow at the PBS/CPB Producer’s Academy, a Sundance Documentary Institute Fellow, and a MacDowell Colony Fellow. Robin is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and an Associate at Harvard University's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. She frequently speaks at universities, colleges, and secondary schools on many topics and works as a consulting producer, advising independent documentaries about fundraising, international co-productions, and distribution. She graduated from Brown with a joint degree in Russian and Film and received her graduate degree in film directing from the All-Russian State Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) in Moscow, Russia (with a “Red Diploma” of honors.)

 

http://www.union.wisc.edu/wud/event.asp?event_id=25835

 

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"Interesting Times: Reflections on Russia in Recent Years"

Robin Hessman, Documentary Filmmaker

 

When: Thursday, April 30, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia, the Department of Slavic Languages and Literature, the Russian Flagship Program, and the Alice D. Mortenson/Petrovich Chair in Russian History. Funding courtesy of the Anonymous Fund of the College of Letters & Science.

 

About the Speaker: Robin Hessman has been a documentary filmmaker and producer for the past 20 years. Her critically-acclaimed film, My Perestroika, premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2010 as part of the US Documentary Competition, aired in 2011 on the PBS independent film series P.O.V. and received a Peabody Award in 2012. Throughout the 1990s she lived in Russia making documentaries and working for Sesame Workshop as the on-site Producer of Ulitsa Sezam, the original Russian language Sesame Street. Robin also co-produced the Peabody-award winning documentary Tupperware! as well as the PBS biography of culinary master Julia Child in Julia! America’s Favorite Chef which aired on PBS on the series American Masters.In addition to her film and TV work, Robin has appeared on the PBS NewsHour, written for The Financial Times and produced radio pieces on Russia for the BBC’s The World. She served as the Director of Documentary Programming for the American Film Festival of Moscow for 5 years. She has been a Copeland Fellow at Amherst College, a Fellow at the PBS/CPB Producer’s Academy, a Sundance Documentary Institute Fellow, and a MacDowell Colony Fellow. Robin is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and an Associate at Harvard University's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. She frequently speaks at universities, colleges, and secondary schools on many topics and works as a consulting producer, advising independent documentaries about fundraising, international co-productions, and distribution. She graduated from Brown with a joint degree in Russian and Film and received her graduate degree in film directing from the All-Russian State Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) in Moscow, Russia (with a “Red Diploma” of honors.)

 

About the Lecture: When the USSR broke apart in 1991, a generation of young people faced a new realm of possibilities. An intimate epic about the extraordinary lives of this last Soviet generation, Robin Hessman’s feature documentary debut tells the stories of five Moscow schoolmates who were brought up behind the Iron Curtain, witnessed the joy and confusion of glasnost', and reached adulthood right as the world changed around them. Through candid first-person testimony, revealing verité footage, and vintage home movies, Hessman, who spent many years living in Moscow, reveals a Russia rarely ever seen on film, where people are frank about their lives and forthcoming about their country. Engaging, funny, and positively inspiring, "My Perestroika" tells a story where politics is personal, honesty overshadows ideology, and history progresses one day, one life at a time. She is here now to reflect on that period and talk about the changes that we are seeing in Russia today. She will speak specifically about the subjects of her film, commenting on what has been happening with them since the completion of the documentary. She will focus on current political changes under the Putin regime and how they have affected the subjects of her film.

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