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September 2013 Events


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reception

CREECA Fall Roundtable and Reception

 

When: Thursday, September 12, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)

 

About the Rountable: Please join us for a gathering to welcome the fall 2013 semester. The event will feature an informal roundtable presentation by members of the CREECA faculty, including Kathryn Hendley (Voss-Bascom Professor of Law and Political Science), Kathryn Ciancia (Assistant Professor of History), Robert J. Kaiser (Professor of Geography), and Yoshiko M. Herrera (Associate Professor of Political Science and CREECA Director). We will also welcome new REECAS MA students.

 

Refreshments will be served!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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snowwi

TEACHING SNOW IN WISCONSIN

A Great World Texts Colloquium for Educators

 

When: September 9-10, 2013

Where: 126 Memorial Library

Sponsors: Great World Texts, Center for the Humanities

 

About the Colloquium: Two-day workshop for educators participating in the 2013-2014 Great World Texts program, featuring talks by campus experts, workshopping activities and discussions, cultural and curricular presenations, and more!

 

Click here for the final schedule.

 

Participating educators: The following texts are recommended as pre-workshop reading. It's also expected that teachers will have finished the novel by the 9th: (1) Coming soon: B. Venkat Mani, "Unpacking Orhan Pamuk's Library" (2) Erdağ Göknar on Snow: excerpt from Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel

 

Note: Interested faculty, staff & students are welcome to attend these talks. The lunch is for participating teachers and presenters only.

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trochev

"How Judges Arrest and Acquit: Soviet Legacies in Post-Communist Criminal Justice"

Alexei Trochev, Nazarbayev University

 

When: Tuesday, September 10, 12:00pm

Where: Lubar Commons, Law Building

Sponsors: The Global Legal Studies Center (GLS), The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)

 

About the Lecture: If someone fell asleep in the late 1980s in a courtroom in Warsaw, Moscow, or Tashkent and suddenly awoke in 2010, she or he would notice many differences. Yet, judges consistently show the Soviet-era “accusatory bias” and side with the state prosecutors in both pre-trial and trial stages of criminal proceedings. Despite highly varied political systems, serious expansion of judicial discretion, a more vibrant bar, and the introduction of adversarial court proceedings, post-communist judges continue to strengthen two late socialist legacies of criminal justice systems: near universal approval of detention of the accused, and avoidance of acquittals. Post-communist judges from Warsaw to Astana have the newly acquired exclusive power to detain the accused, yet they consistently approve 9 out of 10 detention requests and nearly all (96%) requests for extension of detention proposed by state prosecutors. They acquit defendants in criminal trials extremely rarely (with no higher than 3% rates of acquittal)--much like socialist-era judges did in the 1980s when they acquitted less than 2% of the defendants. In other words, if the socialist-era judicial chiefs were to wake up in 2010, they would award post-communist judges with bonuses and holiday trips for an excellent performance simply on the basis of these two indicators. The reason for this attractiveness of detentions and avoidance of acquittals lies in the mutually reinforcing relationships between Soviet legacies and post-communist pro-accusation incentives facing law-enforcement officials and judges.

 

About the Speaker: Born in Syktyvkar, Russia, Alexei Trochev (PhD, University of Toronto; MPA, University of Kansas; Law, Syktyvkar State University) is an Associate Professor at the SHSS at Nazarbayev University. He teaches Social Science Research Methods and Law, Politics, and Society. Prior to that, he taught political science and law courses at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Queen’s University in Kingston, Canada and the Pomor State University in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Between 2002 and 2008, he participated in the Canada-Russia Judicial Partnership Project and Canada-Russia Federalism Workshops, which were attended by top judges and senior government officials from both countries. He edits the journal “Statutes and Decisions: The Laws of the USSR and Its Successor States,” http://www.mesharpe.com/mall/results1.asp?ACR=rsd which has recently covered issues of ethics of the counsel in Russia, judicial politics in Ukraine, and ongoing police reform in Russia. His current research projects explore: 1) judicial profession in Kazakhstan; and 2) judicial behavior outside the courthouses.


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tennison

“The Power of Impossible Ideas: Ordinary Citizens’ Extraordinary Efforts to Avert International Crises”

Sharon Tennison, Founder and President of the Center for Citizen Initiatives

 

When: Tuesday, September 17, 12pm

Where: 336 Ingraham Hall, 1155 Observatory Drive

Sponsors: The International Studies Major, Global Studies, and the Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia

 

Pizza will be served

 

Sharon Tennison is the Founder and President of the Center for Citizen Initiatives, a nonprofit organization that implements programs to assist Russian citizens in securing economic and political reforms and fosters cooperative partnerships and relations between the U.S. and Russia. CCI’s origins date from the height of the Cold War in 1983 when Tennison led a handful of ordinary American citizens upon an extraordinary mission – challenging the dangerous barriers of fear and mistrust between the two Superpowers. The group's preposterous mission was to create an alternative to the arms race and open communications between the U.S. and the USSR. They called themselves “Citizen Diplomats.”



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toshi

"Fallout Victims of the World, Unite! Radioactive Fallout and the Reconstruction of Biological Sciences in the Soviet Union during the Krushchev Era"

Toshihiro Higuchi, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

When: Thursday, September 19, 4:00pm

Where: 206 Ingraham Hall

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)

 

About the Lecture: The literature on the rise of Trofim Lysenko under Stalin’s regime is extensive, and so is the analysis of his precept on the inheritance of acquired characters. Far less is known, however, about the reintroduction of chromosome genetics during the Khrushchev time. While existing studies tend to gloss over this rollback as a teleological triumph of “science” against “pseudoscience,” this talk seeks to introduce the Cold War and its transnational dimension as a major factor in this rehabilitation process. Examining the mid-1950s problem of worldwide radioactive contamination arising from nuclear weapons testing, the presentation will underline a symbiotic relationship between the Kremlin’s growing interest in a nuclear test-ban and the concerted effort on the part of the anti-Lysenko coalition to show the propaganda value of chromosome genetics through its works across the Iron Curtain, namely at the Pugwash conferences and the United Nations.


About the Speaker: Toshihiro Higuchi is an ACLS New Faculty Fellow and Associate Lecturer at the History of Science Department, University of Wisconsin—Madison. His doctoral dissertation is “Radioactive Fallout, the Politics of Risk, and the Making of a Global Environmental Crisis, 1954-1963.”


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karski

“The World Knew"

The Life of Jan Karski, A Diplomat Who Tried to Stop the Holocaust

 

When: September 23-26, 2013

Location: Rotunda of the Wisconsin State Capitol, 2 E Main Street, Madison, WI 53703.

Sponsors: The Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Chicago, the Wisconsin State Division of the Polish American Congress

 

About the Exhibit: Consul General of the Republic of Poland Paulina Kapuścińska and President of the Polish-American Congress in Wisconsin Mark Pienkos will open an exhibit to honor the memory of Jan Karski, the Polish diplomat and eye-witness to the Nazi death camp atrocities who reported to the Western Allies about the Holocaust while there was still time to save millions of lives. The exhibit is sponsored in Wisconsin by the Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago and is being co-presented at the Wisconsin State Capitol thanks to cooperation between the Wisconsin State Governor Scott Walker and Consul General Paulina Kapuścińska. The exhibit was made by the Polish History Museum in Warsaw (www.muzhp.pl) and was made available by Poland’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (www.mfa.gov.pl) and the Jan Karski Educational Foundation (www.jankarski.org). This educational exhibit conveys a timeless civic message about people’s moral choices that even a single person’s actions can make a difference.

 

Consulate General of the Republic of Poland in Chicago
1530 N. Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60610
ph: 1 (312) 337 8166, ext. 218 or cell: 1-312-343-8102
www.chicago.mfa.gov.pl or Twitter: @PLinChicago


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orden

Picturing Russian Colonial Central Asia (ca. 1888): Photography by Orden from the Anahita Gallery Collection

Exhibition Curator: Heather S. Sonntag, PhD

 

When: September 23-October 22, 2013

Location: 3rd Floor, Pyle Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Sponsors: The 14th Annual Central Eurasian Society Conference, The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)

 

About the Exhibit: Among the first to haul cumbersome camera equipment around the Kara Kum desert and other parts of Russian Turkestan after completion of the Trans-Caspian railway from Merv to Samarkand via Bukhara, Orden amassed a remarkable stock of photographs representing colonial Central Asia at the end of the 1880s. A little known photographer, Orden has not been entirely overlooked by scholars interested in images of Central Asia. Yet, he remains effectively obscure. Very little has been written about him, and the significance of his visual take on Turkestan has been under researched. This unique collection stands alone as an important record of modernity in colonial Central Asia and of a photographic history seen to visually exploit Asia within a Russian sphere of European cultural influence.

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MWMF

10th Annual Madison World Music Festival

 

When: September 19-21, 2013

Where: The Memorial Union & Willy Street Fair

 

The Madison World Music Festival is ten years old! We celebrate by returning to a three-day schedule, September 19-21, 2013, in the Memorial Union and at the Willy Street Fair. As in the past nine years, we offer great music from many parts of the world, workshops, and opportunities to dance, all for free. Of special note this year is the large number of women performing and leading bands—of the 11 bands presented, only one is all-male.

 

Below is the tentative line-up:

 

Thursday, 9/19/13, Memorial Union Terrace:

5 pm Chitravina N. Ravikiran Quartet, Carnatic music from India

7 pm Kardemimmit, all-female Kantele band, Finland

9 pm Christine Salem, the unique music of Reunion Island

 

Friday, 9/20/13, Memorial Union Terrace:

5 pm Baladino, Ladino-language group from Israel

7 pm Krar Collective, music and dance from Ethiopia

9 pm Nomadic Massive, conscious hip hop from Canada, with band members from all over the world

 

Saturday, 9/21/13, Willy Street Fair:

1:30 pm Prusinowski Trio, Polish village dance music quintet with a touch of avant-garde improvisation

3:30 pm Dakha Brakha, modern devotional music from Ukraine

5:30 pm Monsieur Perine, French cabaret music from Colombia

7:30 pm Cristina Pato, rousing bagpipe from Spain

 

Saturday, 9/21/13, Memorial Union Terrace:

9:30 pm Joan Soriano, the Bachata king from the Dominican Republic

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janusz

Janusz Prusinowski Trio

Presented by the 10th Annual Madison World Music Festival

 

When: Saturday, September 21, 1:30pm

Where: The Willy Street Fair

 

Janusz Prusinowski Trio is a group of musicians who follow in traditions of village masters they have learned from: Jan Lewandowski, Kazimierz Meto, Józef Zaraś, Piotr and Jan Gaca, Tadeusz Kubiak and many others – but they are also an avant-garde band with their own characteristic sound and language of improvisation. They combine music with dance and the archaic with the modern.

 

For more information, visit the band's website!

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trio

An Informal Evening of Polish Village-Style

Dance & Music

with The Janusz Prusinowski Trio

 

When: September 24, 7:30pm

Where: Great Hall, 4th Floor, Memorial Union, 800 Langdon St, Madison, WI 53706

Sponsors: The Village Dance House

 

Acoustic music played and dances led by the Janusz Prusinowski Trio just featured at Mad World Music Festival and hanging with us for a bit.

 

Freewill Donation Warmly Welcomed

 

Come, Dance, Listen !

 

Questions / FFI: Szymon szymon2005@sbcglobal.net

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sonntaglec

"The Obscure Orden & Historical Photographs of Russian Colonial Central Asia (ca. 1888)"

Heather S. Sonntag, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

When: Thursday, September 26, 4:00pm
Where: The Pyle Center, Room 226

Sponsors: The Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia (CREECA)

 

About the Lecture: Among the first to haul cumbersome camera equipment around the Kara Kum desert and other parts of Russian Turkestan after completion of the Trans-Caspian railway from Merv to Samarkand via Bukhara, Orden amassed a remarkable stock of photographs representing colonial Central Asia at the end of the 1880s. A little known photographer, Orden has not been entirely overlooked by scholars interested in images of Central Asia. Yet, he remains effectively obscure. Very little has been written about him, and the significance of his visual take on Turkestan has been under researched. This lecture introduces Orden and his images held in institutional and private collections in Russia, the United States and Europe. It identifies him through both rare biographical sources and close examination of his work; elaborates on the comprehensive range and geographical reach of his image stock that documents Turkmenia to the Chinese border; and reveals notable shifts of marketing and commercial practice of photography in a Russian imperial context nested within global patterns. This unique collection stands alone as an important record of modernity in colonial Central Asia and of a photographic history seen to visually exploit Asia within a Russian sphere of European cultural influence.

 

About the Speaker: Dr. Heather S. Sonntag is a cultural historian specializing in the early photography of Central Eurasia and is an Honorary Fellow in the Center for Russia, East Europe and Central Asia (CREECA), UW-Madison. Her ongoing research focuses on photographic histories that represent Central Asia and the Caucasus in the late imperial period, specifically in state commissioned albums and collections attributed to individual photographers. Beginning with the 1850s, she explores Russian photography as a technology developed by the military and deployed to the periphery for various practical and symbolic applications. Taking a comparative approach, she considers Russian and global practices to better comprehend social shifts that impact image production, use and meaning. Earning a doctoral degree in 2011 through the Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia, her research has benefitted from an internship at the Library of Congress (2005) where she translated all text in the Turkestan Album 1871-1872 for the digital preservation project, online catalog and her dissertation topic, as well as from a Fulbright fellowship (2006-07), an NCEEER grant (2012), and numerous university grants. Dr. Sonntag is currently working on a publication about the little-known, late 19th-century photographer Orden, whose images depict the Caucasus, Persia and Central Asia. She is simultaneously curating two exhibitions on historical photography: one displayed at the UW-Madison Pyle Center until October 23rd in conjunction with the Central Eurasian Studies Society annual conference; and the other for permanent displays in the United States Embassy, Consulate and American Corners in Kazakhstan (installation in 2014).

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